The use of suspense in bram stokers dracula

Instead, it is composed of a collage of letters, journal entries and diary jottings, in addition to a portion of a ship's log, various newspaper clippings, and even a "phonograph diary. Stoker most likely borrowed this approach to his novel from Wilkie Collins, who used the same technique in his "detective" novel The Woman in White Jonathan Harker's journal entries begin on May 3, sometime in the late nineteenth century. The young London lawyer has been traveling by train across Europe and is currently in Budapest, in route to Count Dracula's estate, located somewhere in the Carpathian Mountains of Transylvania — the "land beyond the forest.

The use of suspense in bram stokers dracula

The genius of this novel lies in the way it is told, not in the story itself. Instead, it is because what is revealed in these letters is carefully calibrated to conceal and reveal.

Bram Stoker seems to be constantly aware of what he is hiding and illuminating for his audience. In reading Dracula, I am struck by how much suspense is created by the characters not knowing what is happening on the other end of the chain of letters.

Stoker knew what he was doing. This factor of readerly knowledge leads to engagement. The reader knows — or suspects — much more than the characters are able or willing to put into their letters.

The use of suspense in bram stokers dracula

I am writing up part of this diary whilst I am waiting for the coach, which is, of course, late; and the crucifix is still around my neck. If this book should ever reach Mina before I do, let it bring my good-bye.

10 Tips from Bram Stoker's Dracula

Here comes the coach! Perhaps one of the keys is helping the characters to conceal information from their own selves. In contemporary novels, The Historian covers similar terrain as Dracula and is inspired by that story.

The Historian tries the same trick but seems just too conscious of this device and the story overplays its hand. Instead, the over-consciousness about technique makes us doubt the characters in The Historian.

The use of suspense in bram stokers dracula

Stoker conceals information from the characters — and gives it to the readers or to other characters. Honesty on the part of the characters themselves — saying the truth as they see it — seems to be the key to effectiveness of the narrative.

- Bram Stoker's Dracula In act 2 scene 6 and act 3 scene 6 of the play ‘Dracula’, the playwrite creates impressive tension by using spine-chilling, ghostly settings, and slyly showing us situations in which characters such as vampires, prey on vulnerable characters such as Mina. - Bram Stoker's Dracula In act 2 scene 6 and act 3 scene 6 of the play ‘Dracula’, the playwrite creates impressive tension by using spine-chilling, ghostly settings, and slyly showing us situations in which characters such as vampires, prey on vulnerable characters such as Mina. In the late 19th century, Bram Stoker released one of the most widely recognized and successful novels in the epistolary or episodic form, Dracula. An epistolary novel is also called a novel of letters, because the narration takes place in the form of letters, possibly journal entries, newspaper clippings, telegrams, doctor’s notes, ship’s logs, and occasionally newspaper reports.

For example, Jonathan writes: She looks paler than usual. I hope the meeting to-night has not upset her. I am truly thankful that she is to be left out of our future work, and even of our deliberations.

So Jonathan overtly thinks he is keeping information from Mina, and he is telling the reader that he will conceal what happens next from his wife. Yet a few pages later in the novel, Mina writes in her own journal, and reveals that she knows much more than Jonathan suspects again, telling the reader private information: Mina then goes on to describe what she knows — which is much of what Jonathan is trying to conceal from her.

The reader feels a step ahead of both of them, but the characters are still respected by the reader and are still believedsince the characters are trying to be honest to themselves.

Credibility is vital to their own stories. The fact that they are concealing critical information from their own consciousness just adds to the suspense and the vitality of the narrative. One way of creating these self-deceptive characters is to have them write their thoughts down.

It is hard to write characters that are at once believable, yet also on some level oblivious to the import of their own actions. The characters need to believe their stories, even if they are going off a cliff.This is not the case, however; because of the carefully calculated way in which Stoker indicates and unravels the mystery of Count Dracula, he achieves a mastery over his subject matter that mitigates the raw horror and, instead, intensifies each chapter's sense of anxiety and portentous dread.

Oct 05,  · Book Review: Dracula, by Bram Stoker Posted on October 5, by RNAdams2 Jonathan Harper, a young assistant to a London lawyer, is dispatched to meet with a client who requires assistance resolving some issues of property transfer, as he is preparing to relocate to England.

The setting of the story begins in 19th century Europe, in the eerie country of Transylvania. A solicitor from England named Jonathan Harker is sent by a business man to meet with an old Count named Dracula at his castle located far from civilization.

Residents of Transylvania who become aw. In the late 19th century, Bram Stoker released one of the most widely recognized and successful novels in the epistolary or episodic form, Dracula. An epistolary novel is also called a novel of letters, because the narration takes place in the form of letters, possibly journal entries, newspaper clippings, telegrams, doctor’s notes, ship’s logs, and occasionally newspaper reports.

Writer’s Digest Annotated Classics: Dracula, by Bram Stoker with annotations by Mort Castle, is available now! More than just an annotated version of the novel, this edition presents sharply focused, valuable techniques for writers who want to learn more about the techniques Bram .

Bram Stoker’s Dracula Bram Stoker’s Dracula is a classic example of Gothic writing. Gothic writing was very popular in the 18th and 19th centuries.

In the early centuries, Gothic writing would frighten the audience and it was also used as a style of architecture.

10 Tips from Bram Stoker's Dracula